Military online dating scams

Said Chandler’s wife, Jeanne: “We heard about one lady, the guy was impersonating Gen. She sold her house because she was going to go live in the general’s house and sent the scammer the money.” While her husband served as sergeant major of the Army, Jeanne became adept at finding fake accounts.She would punch in a few search terms, see what popped up and then try to get the bogus pages taken down.These criminals—who also troll social media sites and chat rooms in search of romantic victims—usually claim to be Americans traveling or working abroad. While their most common targets are women over 40 who are divorced, widowed, and/or disabled, but every age group and demographic is at risk. You’re contacted online by someone who appears interested in you.He or she may have a profile you can read or a picture that is e-mailed to you.

He is on Google , Linked In and Facebook, where as recently as last week a Kentucky woman named Lois had posted a note: “Hi baby just calling to see what you was doing.” Literally hundreds of dating profiles and social media accounts are illustrated with photographs of the same handsome, salt-and-pepper-haired military man. He’s a high-profile example of the military romance scheme, where West Africa-based scammers scour Pentagon Web sites, Facebook pages and other social media accounts to harvest photographs of troops.Photos of senior Army leaders have proved so popular that the Army’s public affairs office monitors misuse.“They pop up in the 20s per day, usually with Facebook,” Master Sgt. Some victims have a tough time accepting that they’ve been scammed.But, because they are deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq, they need you to sign up for an expensive telecommunications service like “Military TELEX” in order to make that happen.They profess unending love as their motivator and, unfortunately, many women have fallen for it.

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